Reducing Concurrent Sexual Partnerships among Blacks in the Rural Southeastern United States: Development of Narrative Messages for a Radio Campaign

Joan R. Cates, Diane B. Francis, Catalina Ramirez, Jane D. Brown, Victor J. Schoenbach, Thierry Fortune, Wizdom Powell Hammond, Adaora A. Adimora

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the United States, heterosexual transmission of HIV infection is dramatically higher among Blacks than among Whites. Overlapping (concurrent) sexual partnerships promote HIV transmission. The authors describe their process for developing a radio campaign (Escape the Web) to raise awareness among 18-34-year-old Black adults of the effect of concurrency on HIV transmission in the rural South. Radio is a powerful channel for the delivery of narrative-style health messages. Through six focus groups (n = 51) and 42 intercept interviews, the authors explored attitudes toward concurrency and solicited feedback on sample messages. Men were advised to (a) end concurrent partnerships and not to begin new ones; (b) use condoms consistently with all partners; and (c) tell others about the risks of concurrency and benefits of ending concurrent partnerships. The narrative portrayed risky behaviors that trigger initiation of casual partnerships. Women were advised to (a) end partnerships in which they are not their partner's only partner; (b) use condoms consistently with all partners; and (c) tell others about the risks of concurrency and benefits of ending concurrent partnerships. Messages for all advised better modeling for children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1264-1274
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume20
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Library and Information Sciences

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