Regional left ventricular myocardial contractility and stress in a finite element model of posterobasal myocardial infarction

Jonathan F. Wenk, Kay Sun, Zhihong Zhang, Mehrdad Soleimani, Liang Ge, David Saloner, Arthur W. Wallace, Mark B. Ratcliffe, Julius M. Guccione

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recently, a noninvasive method for determining regional myocardial contractility, using an animal-specific finite element (FE) model-based optimization, was developed to study a sheep with anteroapical infarction (Sun et al. , 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001). Using the methodology developed in the previous study (Sun et al. , 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001), which incorporates tagged magnetic resonance images, three-dimensional myocardial strains, left ventricular (LV) volumes, and LV cardiac catheterization pressures, the regional myocardial contractility and stress distribution of a sheep with posterobasal infarction were investigated. Active material parameters in the noninfarcted border zone (BZ) myocardium adjacent to the infarct (Tmax_B), in the myocardium remote from the infarct (Tmax_R), and in the infarct (Tmax_I) were estimated by minimizing the errors between FE model-predicted and experimentally measured systolic strains and LV volumes using the previously developed optimization scheme. The optimized Tmax_B was found to be significantly depressed relative to Tmax_R, while Tmax_I was found to be zero. The myofiber stress in the BZ was found to be elevated, relative to the remote region. This could cause further damage to the contracting myocytes, leading to heart failure.

Original languageEnglish
Article number044501
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume133
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2011

Keywords

  • Cardiac mechanics
  • Finite element modeling
  • Numerical optimization
  • Tagged magnetic resonance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

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