Relationship between pain catastrophizing and 6-month outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

Kate N. Jochimsen, Margaret R. Pelton, Carl G. Mattacola, Laura J. Huston, Emily K. Reinke, Kurt P. Spindler, Christian Lattermann, Cale A. Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Pain catastrophizing predicts poor outcomes following orthopedic procedures for patients with chronic conditions; however, limited research has focused on acute injuries. This study aimed to quantify the progression of Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) scores from injury to 6-months post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) and determine if preoperative or 6-month PCS scores were related with self-reported pain or function 6 months post-ACLR. The authors hypothesized PCS scores would minimally fluctuate and would be related with worse outcomes 6-months post-ACLR. Methods: All 48 participants (27 male/21 female; aged 22.7 [4.6] y, body mass index 24 [3.3]) included in this secondary analysis of a randomized control trial sustained an ACL injury during sports activity. Participants completed the PCS and Pain Visual Analog Scale (VAS) at 5 time points: within 7 days of injury (INITIAL), day of surgery, 2 weeks postoperative (2W), 6 weeks postoperative (6W), and 6 months postoperative (6M). They completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) at 6M. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and Spearman rank-order correlations were used for analysis. Results: PCS scores were not fixed (INITIAL: 11.6 [10.8], day of surgery: 2.5 [3.7], 2W: 8.0 [7.8], 6W: 3.7 [6], 6M: 0.8 [2.3]). They fluctuated in response to injury and ACLR similar to Pain VAS scores. Preoperative PCS scores were not related with 6M outcomes; however, 6M PCS scores were significantly related with 6M Pain VAS and KOOS subscales. Conclusions: PCS scores fluctuated in response to injury and ACLR. Preoperative PCS scores were not related with 6M outcomes; however, 6M PCS scores correlated with pain and function at 6M. High pain catastrophizing appears to be a natural response immediately following acute ACL injury and ACLR, but may not be indicative of a poor postoperative result. PCS scores 6-months following ACLR may provide useful information regarding self-reported pain and function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)808-812
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to acknowledge the funding of National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (award number 5K23AR060275) and University of Kentucky (CTSA award number UL1TR000117).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Keywords

  • ACLR
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Psychosocial factors
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Relationship between pain catastrophizing and 6-month outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this