Relationship of mode of porcine somatotropin administration and dietary fat to the growth performance and carcass characteristics of finishing pigs.

M. J. Azain, K. D. Bullock, T. R. Kasser, J. J. Veenhuizen

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17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ninety-six pigs were used to investigate the relationship of diet (control vs fat-supplemented with equal energy:protein ratios), porcine somatotropin (pST) administration (non-treated; 2 mg/d, daily injection; and 2 mg/d, 6-wk implant), and sex (barrows and gilts) to performance and carcass characteristics. Diet and pST treatments were initiated at 87 kg of BW and continued for 38 d. Both the fat-supplemented diet (P less than .001) and pST treatment (P less than .0001) improved feed efficiency. The effects of diet were accounted for by differences in energy density of the diets. Across diets, pST improved gain:feed ratio by 29 and 16% in pigs treated by daily injection and the implant, respectively; the two modes of delivery resulted in different responses (P less than .01). Circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels, determined from blood samples drawn on d 35, were increased 2.5-fold above those of controls in pigs treated by either daily injection or the implant. However, the elevation of glucose and decrease in blood urea nitrogen concentrations in response to pST were of a greater magnitude in pigs treated by daily injection. Similarly, reductions in backfat thickness and the rate of backfat accretion determined by ultrasound were greater in response to the daily injection of pST than in response to the implant. Lean meat ratio, calculated from measurements with a Fat-O-Meater probe, was increased by 6 and 13% by the implant and daily injection, respectively. It is concluded that although the use of an implant that delivers pST on a continuous basis was as effective as the same dose administered as a bolus injection for increasing IGF-I levels, it was less effective in improving feed efficiency and carcass quality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3086-3095
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Animal Science
Volume70
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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