Relationship of Religiosity and Spirituality to Hazardous Drinking, Drug Use, and Depression Among Sexual Minority Women

Laurie Drabble, Cindy B. Veldhuis, Barth B. Riley, Sharon Rostosky, Tonda L. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using data from Wave 3 of the Chicago Health and Life Experiences of Women (CHLEW) study (N = 699), we explored whether religiosity and spirituality were associated with risk of hazardous drinking, drug use, and depression among sexual minority women (SMW; i.e., lesbian, bisexual) and possible differences by race/ethnicity. Participants were more likely to endorse spirituality than religiosity, and endorsement of each was highest among African American SMW. We found no protective effect of religiosity or spirituality for hazardous drinking or drug use. An association initially found between identifying as very spiritual and past-year depression disappeared when controlling for help-seeking. Among SMW with high religiosity, African American SMW were more likely than White SMW to report hazardous drinking. Latina SMW with higher spirituality were more likely than White SMW to report drug use. Results suggest that religiosity and spirituality affect subgroups differently, which should be considered in future research on resiliency among SMW.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1734-1757
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Homosexuality
Volume65
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 10 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • Sexual minority women
  • depression
  • hazardous drinking
  • protective factors
  • religiosity
  • risk factors
  • spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • General Psychology

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