Renal Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Arterial Pressure Responses to Changes in Postural Position of Conscious Dogs (42993)

Jeffrey L. Osborn, Thomas G. Curro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Experiments were conducted in conscious dogs to determine the relationships between postural position, arterial pressure, and renal sympathetic nerve activity. Observations of the changes in arterial pressure and renal nerve activity were made when animals spontaneously changed postural position from lying to sitting, sitting to standing, standing to sitting, and sitting to lying. Rising to sit from lying down increased arterial pressure from 109 ± 5 to 125 ± 3 mm Hg and increased renal nerve activity by 96 ± 58 μV/sec (61% of control). Movement from the sitting to standing position decreased renal nerve activity by 90 ± 39 μ/sec (48% of control) without changing mean arterial pressure. Sitting down from standing also did not change arterial pressure, whereas renal nerve activity increased by 56 ± 17 μV/sec (33% of control). Returning to the lying position (from sitting) decreased arterial pressure, and this hypotension was associated with significant reductions in renal nerve activity. These results indicate that nonuniform changes in sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system must occur to various vascular beds during changes in postural position of conscious dogs. Thus, renal sympathetic outflow may or may not reflect changes in nerve traffic which contribute to alterations in arterial pressure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-254
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
Volume192
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (all)

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