Responses of caryopsis germination, early seedling growth and ramet clonal growth of Bromus inermis to soil salinity

Huiling Yang, Zhenying Huang, Carol C. Baskin, Jerry M. Baskin, Zhiping Cao, Xuanwei Zhu, Ming Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bromus inermis is a dominant rhizomatous grass in Otindag Sandland of North China, where soil salinization is increasing. We studied responses of caryopsis germination, early seedling growth and ramet integrative growth of this clonal plant to salinity. Caryopses germinated in NaCl solutions ≤0.2 M. Ungerminated caryopses treated with >0.02 M NaCl germinated after transfer to 0.02 M NaCl, and percentage germination recovery increased with treatment NaCl concentration. No seedlings survived NaCl concentrations >0.3 M. At 0.3 M NaCl, biomass and height of seedlings significantly decreased with increase in treatment NaCl concentration, but root/shoot ratio significantly increased. Ramets exposed to high salinity survived if interconnected to a neighbour ramet not exposed to salinity. However, if interconnections were severed ramets exposed to high salinity died. Thus, B. inermis is adapted to the saline environment in Otindag Sandland in both the asexual and sexual stages of its life cycle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-275
Number of pages11
JournalPlant and Soil
Volume316
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funds for this study were provided by the Key Basic Research and Development Plan of China (2007CB106802), Key Project of CAS (KZCX2-XB2-01), National Natural Science Foundation of P. R. China (30570281, 30872074, 30570296), and National Science Foundation for Post-doctoral Scientists of China (20080430589).

Keywords

  • Bromus inermis
  • Clonal integration
  • Germination recovery
  • Otindag Sandland
  • Salt tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Plant Science

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