Retention throughout the HIV care and treatment cascade: From diagnosis to antiretroviral treatment of adults and children living with HIV - Haiti, 1985-2015

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8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Monitoring retention of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in the HIV care and treatment cascade is essential to guide program strategy and evaluate progress toward globally-endorsed 90-90-90 targets (i.e., 90% of PLHIV diagnosed, 81% on sustained antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 73% virally suppressed). We describe national retention from diagnosis throughout the cascade for patients receiving HIV services in Haiti during 1985-2015, with a focus on those receiving HIV services during 2008-2015. Among the 266,256 newly diagnosed PLHIV during 1985-2015, 49% were linked-to-care, 30% started ART, and 18% were retained on ART by the time of database closure. Similarly, among the 192,187 newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients during 2008-2015, 50% were linked to care, 31% started ART, and 19% were retained on ART by the time of database closure. Most patients (90-92%) at all cascade steps were adults (≥15 years old), among whomthe majority (60-61%) were female. During 2008-2015, outcomes varied significantly across 42 administrative districts (arrondissements) of residence; cumulative linkage-to-care ranged from23%to 69%, cumulative ART initiation among care enrollees ranged from 2% to 80%, and cumulative ART retention among ART enrollees ranged from 30%to 88%. Compared with adults, children had lower cumulative incidence of ART initiation among care enrollees (64% versus 47%) and lower cumulative retention among ART enrollees (64% versus 50%). Cumulative linkage-to-care was low and should be prioritized for improvement. Variations in outcomes by arrondissement and between adults and children require further investigation and programmatic response.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-70
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume97
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Financial support: This research has been supported by the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2017 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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