Role of NT-proBNP in the prediction of moderate to severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in preterm infants

Safdar Khan, Vanessa Anne Concina, Douglas Schneider, Philip Westgate, Susana Arriagada, Henrietta Bada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the clinical utility of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) for prediction of moderate to severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We hypothesized that elevated NT-proBNP levels at 4 weeks of postnatal age may predict the severity of BPD in preterm infants. Study Design: The study design was a prospective observational study. The research team enrolled and followed a cohort of 70 infants with gestational age less than or equal to 30 weeks. The plasma NT-proBNP levels were measured at the postnatal day 28th. We further followed and categorized infants into two groups. Infants with no or mild BPD (Group 1) and infants with moderate or severe BPD (Group 2). We compared plasma NT-proBNP levels at 28th day of postnatal life between Groups 1 and 2. The difference in NT-proBNP levels on day 28th between groups was used to predict the severity of BPD. Results: Plasma NT-proBNP was significantly elevated in Group 2 compared with Group 1, median (IQR) of 845 pg/mL (553, 1632) compared with 726 pg/mL (391, 923), P = 0.02. NT-proBNP had a fair predictive accuracy (C statistics of 0.68) to determine moderate to severe BPD. Conclusion: NT-proBNP may be a useful biomarker in conjunction with clinical factors as a predictor of severe BPD. For future directions, the trend of NT-proBNP in infants with BPD may have clinical significance in monitoring of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)376-382
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Pulmonology
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The project described was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, UL1TR000117, the Dean of the College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, and the Kentucky Children's Hospital (Children's Miracle Network grant). The authors thank the NICU nurses, research nurses, and respiratory therapists, the fellows, attending neonatologists and the parents and families at Kentucky Children's Hospital. The authors thank Ms. Nichole Park for her assistance in the NT‐proBNP assays. This project was presented at the 2016 Pediatric Academic Society Conference at Baltimore, MD. The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH (grant number UL1TR000117), and Children's Miracle Network supported this project.

Funding Information:
The project described was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, UL1TR000117, the Dean of the College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, and the Kentucky Children's Hospital (Children's Miracle Network grant). The authors thank the NICU nurses, research nurses, and respiratory therapists, the fellows, attending neonatologists and the parents and families at Kentucky Children's Hospital. The authors thank Ms. Nichole Park for her assistance in the NT-proBNP assays. This project was presented at the 2016 Pediatric Academic Society Conference at Baltimore, MD. The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH (grant number UL1TR000117), and Children's Miracle Network supported this project.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Keywords

  • biomarkers
  • bronchopulmonary dysplasia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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