Science engagement and science achievement in the context of science instruction: a multilevel analysis of U.S. students and schools

Larry J. Grabau, Xin Ma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using data from the 2006 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), we explored nine aspects of science engagement (science self-efficacy, science self-concept, enjoyment of science, general interest in learning science, instrumental motivation for science, future-oriented science motivation, general value of science, personal value of science, and science-related activities) as outcomes and predictors of science achievement. Based on results from multilevel modelling with 4456 students nested within 132 schools, we found that all aspects of science engagement were statistically significantly and positively related to science achievement, and nearly all showed medium or large effect sizes. Each aspect was positively associated with one of the (four) practices (strategies) of science teaching. Focus on applications or models was positively related to the most aspects of science engagement (science self-concept, enjoyment of science, instrumental motivation for science, general value of science, and personal value of science). Hands-on activities were positively related to additional aspects of science engagement (science self-efficacy and general interest in learning science) and also showed a positive relationship with science achievement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1045-1068
Number of pages24
JournalInternational Journal of Science Education
Volume39
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Science engagement
  • U.S. adolescents
  • science achievement
  • science teaching practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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