Seed position in spikelet as a contributing factor to the success of the winter annual invasive grass Aegilops tauschii

Ai Bo Wang, Carol C. Baskin, Jerry M. Baskin, Jianqing Ding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Seed position – dependent effects on seed dormancy/germination are well documented at the inflorescence/infructescence level, but less is known about seeds at different positions within a dispersal unit. For the invasive winter annual grass Aegilops tauschii, we quantified morphology, mass and dormancy/germination of seeds from basal (1), middle (2), and distal (3) positions in two spikelet types (Left and Right). We also investigated seedling emergence, survival, plant size and seed production of plants from seeds in different spikelet positions of two spikelet types under different soil nutrient and water conditions. We found that these seed, seedling and plant traits performed as mirror images between the Left and Right spikelet types. The middle seed was significantly the longest and had the maximum mass, while the basal seed was the shortest and had medium mass. Middle seeds had the highest increase in mass during imbibition and the highest germination percentages and rates, while basal seeds had the lowest. Seedling emergence and survival, plant size and seed production for each position of seeds were highest in the added fertilizer combined with regular watering treatment and lowest in the no fertilizer combined with natural moisture, while height of plants derived from the middle and the distal seeds was significantly higher than that of plants derived from the basal seeds under all soil nutrient and water conditions. Seedling survival, number of tillers per plant and seed production per plant from the middle and distal seeds were significantly lower than those from basal seeds under all soil nutrient and water treatments. The considerable variation in seedling emergence and survival, plant size and seed production between seeds in different positions in the spikelet results in much flexibility in all stages of the life cycle, thereby likely contributing to the invasiveness of A. tauschii.

Original languageEnglish
Article number916451
JournalFrontiers in Plant Science
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Major Public Welfare Projects in Henan Province (201300311300).

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2022 Wang, Baskin, Baskin and Ding.

Keywords

  • Poaceae
  • annual grass
  • effects
  • invasive species
  • seed germination
  • seed position-dependent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Seed position in spikelet as a contributing factor to the success of the winter annual invasive grass Aegilops tauschii'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this