Selective upregulation of transcripts for six molecules related to t cell costimulation and phagocyte recruitment and activation among 734 immunity-related genes in the brain during perforin-dependent, cd8+ t cell-mediated elimination of toxoplasma gondii cysts

Jenny Lutshumba, Eri Ochiai, Qila Sa, Namrata Anand, Yasuhiro Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

We recently found that an invasion of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells into tissue cysts of Toxoplasma gondii initiates an elimination of the cysts in association with an accumulation of microglia and macrophages. In the present study, we compared mRNA levels for 734 immune-related genes in the brains of infected SCID mice that received perforin-sufficient or -deficient CD8+ immune T cells at 3 weeks after infection. At 7 days after the T cell transfer, mRNA levels for only six genes were identified to be greater in the recipients of the perforin-sufficient T cells than in the recipients of the perforin-deficient T cells. These six molecules included two T cell costimulatory molecules, inducible T cell costimulator receptor (ICOS) and its ligand (ICOSL); two chemokine receptors, C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) and CXCR6; and two molecules related to an activation of microglia and macrophages, interleukin 18 receptor 1 (IL-18R1) and chitinase-like 3 (Chil3). Consistently, a marked reduction of cyst numbers and upregulation of ICOS, CXCR3, CXCR6, IL-18R1, and Chil3 mRNA levels were also detected when the perforin-sufficient CD8+ immune T cells were transferred to infected SCID mice at 6 weeks after infection, indicating that the CD8+ T cell-mediated protective immunity is capable of eliminating mature T. gondii cysts. These results together suggest that ICOS-ICOSL interactions are crucial for activating CD8+ cytotoxic immune T cells to initiate the destruction of T. gondii cysts and that CXCR3, CXCR6, and IL-18R are involved in recruitment and activation of microglia and macrophages to the T cell-attacked cysts for their elimination. IMPORTANCE T. gondii establishes a chronic infection by forming tissue cysts, which can grow into sizes greater than 50 μm in diameter as a consequence of containing hundreds to thousands of organisms surrounded by the cyst wall within infected cells. Our recent studies using murine models uncovered that CD8+ cytotoxic T cells penetrate into the cysts in a perforin-dependent manner and induce their elimination, which is accompanied with an accumulation of phagocytic cells to the T cell-attacked target. This is the first evidence of the ability of the T cells to invade into a large target for its elimination. However, the mechanisms involved in anticyst immunity remain unclear. Immune profiling analyses of 734 immune-related genes in the present study provided a valuable foundation to initiate elucidating detailed molecular mechanisms of the novel effector function of the immune system operated by perforin-mediated invasion of CD8+ T cells into large targets for their elimination.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere00189
JournalmSystems
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Lutshumba et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

Keywords

  • CD8+ cytotoxic T cells
  • Chemokine receptor
  • Coactivation molecules
  • Costimulatory molecules
  • Large-scale gene expression profile
  • Perforin
  • Phagocytes
  • T cell invasion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology
  • Biochemistry
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Microbiology
  • Modeling and Simulation

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