Self-efficacy, motivation, and academic adjustment among African American women attending institutions of higher education

Deneia M. Thomas, Keisha M. Love, Clarissa Roan-Belle, Kenneth M. Tyler, Carrie Lynn Brown, Patton O. Garriott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the relationships among self-efficacy beliefs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and academic adjustment among 111 African American women in college. Results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs predicted Motivation to Know, Externally Regulated motivation, Identified motivation, and academic adjustment. Furthermore, Motivation to Know partially mediated the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs and academic adjustment. Contrary to prediction, extrinsic motivation did not mediate the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs and academic adjustment. The implications of these findings for faculty, higher education administrators, and mental health counselors are provided, as well directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-171
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Negro Education
Volume78
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Anthropology

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