Seven samurai to protect "our" food: The reform of the food safety regulatory system in Japan after the BSE crisis of 2001

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using the case of food safety governance reform in Japan between 2001 and 2003, this paper examines the relationship between science and trust. The paper explains how the discovery of the first BSE positive cow and consequent food safety scandals in 2001 politicized the role of science in protecting the safety of the food supply. The analysis of the Parliamentary debate focuses on the contestation among legislators and other participants over three dimensions of risk science, including "knowledge," "objects," and "beneficiaries." The metaphor of "seven samurai" and the relationally situated roles of "samurai," "bandits," and "beneficiaries" are used to show that in the process of policy making certain moral and ethical expectations on a new expert institution for food safety were contested and negotiated to frame responsibilities and commitments of social actors for creating the food system based on trust.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)567-580
Number of pages14
JournalAgriculture and Human Values
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Beef
  • Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)
  • Food safety
  • Japan
  • Risk analysis model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Seven samurai to protect "our" food: The reform of the food safety regulatory system in Japan after the BSE crisis of 2001'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this