Sex-specific viability, sex linkage and dominance in genomic imprinting

Jeremy Van Cleve, Marcus W. Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Genomic imprinting is a phenomenon by which the expression of an allele at a locus depends on the parent of origin. Two different two-locus evolutionary models are presented in which a second locus modifies the imprinting status of the primary locus, which is under differential selection in males and females. In the first model, a modifier allele that imprints the primary locus invades the population when the average dominance coefficient among females and males is < 1\2 and selection is weak. The condition for invasion is always heavily contingent upon the extent of dominance. Imprinting is more likely in the sex experiencing weaker selection only under some parameter regimes, whereas imprinting by either sex is equally likely under other regimes. The second model shows that a modifier allele that induces imprinting will increase when imprinting has a direct selective advantage. The results are not qualitatively dependent on whether the modifier locus is autosomal or X linked.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1101-1118
Number of pages18
JournalGenetics
Volume176
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

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