Sexual violence at first intercourse against women in Moshi, northern Tanzania: Prevalence, risk factors, and consequences

Corrine M. Williams, Laura Ann McCloskey, Ulla Larsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

To explore the relationship between sexual violence at first intercourse and later sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Moshi, Tanzania, we analysed data from a representative household survey that comprised face-to-face interviews with 1,835 women and tests for six STIs on biological samples from 1,235 of these women. Overall, 10.9 per cent report forced first intercourse and 15.3 per cent report unwanted first intercourse. Unadjusted analysis shows a relationship between forced first intercourse and STIs (OR: 1.72, 95 per cent CI: 1.19-2.51). Life-course variables mediate this relationship. Significant predictors of having an STI include older age, more sexual partners, and a partner who has children with other women. Coerced first intercourse appears to be associated with changes in the life course of women and with a heightened risk of contracting an STI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-348
Number of pages14
JournalPopulation Studies
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
2 This paper was submitted in partial fulfillment of Dr Williams’ requirements for a doctorate in public health, and was supported in part by the Harvard University School of Public Health Initiative for Minority Student Development (NIH R25 GM55353). Findings were obtained through research supported by the NIH/ NICHD (R01 HD 41202) to Dr Larsen. The authors thank Dr Michael Ganz and Dr Louise Ryan for their helpful comments.

Keywords

  • Domestic violence
  • Reproductive health
  • Sexual violence
  • Sexually transmitted infections
  • Tanzania

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • History

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