Simplified strut-based model for cracking of infill walls due to excavation-induced distortions

Jorge Romana-Giraldo, L. Sebastian Bryson

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

Conventionally, damage in adjacent structures to excavations is evaluated considering the adjacent facilities as deep beams in which the stiffness is varied to represent the different building types. For frame buildings, this approach may not be appropriate given the interaction of the frame and the infill walls. This study presents a simplified model to determine the critical distortion and damage in infill panels of frame buildings due to excavations. The interaction between the infill panel and its bounding frame elements is evaluated by representing the wall as an equivalent strut; thus, the likelihood of cracking on each floor of the building can be evaluated independently. The presented approach neglects the effects of transverse beams and RC slabs on the cracking of the infill walls. The presented approach is compared with a data set of published experimental results to assess its validity and limitations. Although the original development of the strut model was based on horizontally loaded frames, using a factor of 1/3 for the cracking strain of the masonry was deemed satisfactory in light of the experimental results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-43
Number of pages10
JournalGeotechnical Special Publication
Volume2021-May
Issue numberGSP 324
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Event2021 International Foundations Congress and Equipment Expo: Earth Retention, Ground Improvement, and Seepage Control, IFCEE 2021 - Dallas, United States
Duration: May 10 2021May 14 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Financial support for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation (NSF) through Grant No. 1463198. The opinions and recommendations provided in this paper are solely those of the authors and are not necessarily consistent with the policies of NSF. The authors gratefully acknowledge Central Builders Supply (Montandon, PA), CETCO (Hoffman Estates, IL) and Geo-Solutions, Inc. (New Kensington, PA) for the time, resources, and materials given to this study. Financial assistance also was provided the Jeffrey C. Evans Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory endowed by Michael and Laureen Costa. The authors thank Bucknell students Gray Warden, Ben Finley, Ben Bliss, and Nancy Ingabire Abayo for their assistance with the field and laboratory work. Finally, this work would not have been possible without the contributions from James Gutelius, Bucknell Director of Civil Engineering laboratories.

Funding Information:
The authors gratefully acknowledge the Iowa Department of Transportation (Iowa DOT), the Iowa Highway Research Board (IHRB), and the Recycled Materials Resource Center (RMRC) for their financial support (Project No. 18-681, TR-764). Special thanks to the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) for their professional guidance and support on this study. The findings and opinions in this study are solely those of the authors. Special thanks to Dr. Steven Mickelson for use of the ISU rainfall simulator and to Carl Pederson for guidance and expertise with respect to maintenance, operation, and use of the ISU rainfall simulator.

Funding Information:
Funding for this research was provided by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under NSF CA No. EEC-1449501. Operation of the centrifuge facility at the University of California, Davis was also supported by the NSF as part of the Natural Hazards and Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI) network under award CMMI -1520581. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of NSF. The authors thank the staff at the UC Davis Center for Geotechnical Modeling and UC Davis researchers Tamar Baumer, Brian Sawyer, Charles Graddy , Sumeet Sinha, and Kate Darby.

Funding Information:
The authors would like to acknowledge and express deep appreciation to the Deep Foundations Institute (DFI) who provided financial support for this project. The authors would also like to thank GEI Consultants, Inc. who provided matching financial support.

Funding Information:
This research was funded in part by Geopier Foundation Company and by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grants CMMI-1825189 and CMMI-1937984. This support is gratefully acknowledged. However, any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF or Geopier Foundation Company.

Funding Information:
The authors would like to express their gratitude for the funding and support provided by Texas Department of Transportation and the City of Irving Landfill that made this research possible.

Funding Information:
Funding to support the reconnaissance of Anchorage and the neighboring communities following the 30 November 2018 earthquake was provided to the lead author by the Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance (GEER) Association, through the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI -1266418, and is gratefully acknowledged. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF. The authors would like to acknowledge the GEER team, including Kevin Franke, Rich Koehler, Christine Beyzaei, Ashly Cabas, Sam Christie, Steve Dickenson, Ian Pierce, and Joey Yang. Kannon Lee assisted the lead author during the first visit to the West Dowling Street Bridge. The authors are grateful for the helpful discussions with and assistance provided by John Thornley.

Funding Information:
This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under NSF CA No. EEC-1449501. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NSF. This is a project in collaboration with the C enter for Bio-mediated and Bio-inspired Geotechnics (CBBG) EICP research team led by Prof . Edward Kavazanjian, Jr. at Arizona State University

Funding Information:
The authors would like to acknowledge the support of the University Research Board (URB) at the American University of Beirut and that of Engineering Reseach International (ERI) in funding this work.

Funding Information:
This study was financially supported by the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) through the KTRAN program. Mr. Luke Metheny, the chief geotechnical engineer at KDOT, is the project monitor.

Funding Information:
The authors are grateful for the financial and technical support provided by the National Key RD & Program of China (2020YFC1807200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41672294 and 41877231), Scientific Research Foundation of Graduate School of Southeast University (Grant No. YBPY1926) , Colleges and Universities in Jiangsu Province Plans to Graduate Research and Innovation (Grant No. KYCX19 -0098) and Scientific Research Foundation of Graduate School of Southeast University (Grant No. YBPY1926) .

Funding Information:
Funding for this research includes financial funding from the Project (No. 044007003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.51978381).

Funding Information:
The authors wanted to show their appreciation to John Siekmeier for his kind help and providing valuable information and FWD test results from the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) to use in this study. This manuscript is based upon work supported by MnDOT under contract numbers 1034932 entitled " Effectiveness of Geotextile/Geogrids in Roadway Construction; Determine a Granular Equivalent (G.E.) Factor" .

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Architecture
  • Building and Construction
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

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