Single-Leg Hop Stabilization Throughout Concussion Recovery: A Preliminary Biomechanical Assessment

Landon B. Lempke, Matthew C. Hoch, Jarrod A. Call, Julianne D. Schmidt, Robert C. Lynall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Context: Aberrant movement patterns among individuals with concussion history have been reported during sport-related movement. However, the acute postconcussion kinematic and kinetic biomechanical movement patterns during a rapid acceleration–deceleration task have not been profiled and leaves their progressive trajectory unknown. Our study aimed to examine single-leg hop stabilization kinematics and kinetics between concussed and healthy-matched controls acutely (≤7 d) and when asymptomatic (≤72 h of symptom resolution). Design: Prospective, cohort laboratory study. Methods: Ten concussed (60% male; 19.2 [0.9] y; 178.7 [14.0] cm; 71.3 [18.0] kg) and 10 matched controls (60% male; 19.5 [1.2] y; 176.1 [12.6] cm; 71.0 [17.0] kg) completed the single-leg hop stabilization task under single and dual task (subtracting by 6’s or 7’s) at both time points. Participants stood on a 30-cm tall box set 50% of their height behind force plates while in an athletic stance. A synchronized light was illuminated randomly, queuing participants to initiate the movement as rapidly as possible. Participants then jumped forward, landed on their nondominant leg, and were instructed to reach and maintain stabilization as fast as possible upon ground contact. We used 2 (group) × 2 (time) mixed-model analyses of variance to compare single-leg hop stabilization outcomes separately during single and dual task. Results: We observed a significant main group effect for single-task ankle plantarflexion moment, with greater normalized torque (mean difference = 0.03 N·m/body weight; P = .048, g = 1.18) for concussed individuals across time points. A significant interaction effect for single-task reaction time indicated that concussed individuals had slower performance acutely relative to asymptomatic (mean difference = 0.09 s; P = .015, g = 0.64), while control group performance was stable. No other main or interaction effects for single-leg hop stabilization task metrics were present during single and dual task (P ≥ .051). Conclusions: Greater ankle plantarflexion torque coupled with slower reaction time may indicate stiff, conservative single-leg hop stabilization performance acutely following concussion. Our findings shed preliminary light on the recovery trajectories of biomechanical alterations following concussion and provide specific kinematic and kinetic focal points for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)513-523
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Keywords

  • human movement
  • injury prevention
  • mild traumatic brain injury
  • return to sport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Single-Leg Hop Stabilization Throughout Concussion Recovery: A Preliminary Biomechanical Assessment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this