Skin cancer surveillance behaviors among US Hispanic adults

Elliot J. Coups, Jerod L. Stapleton, Shawna V. Hudson, Amanda Medina-Forrester, Stephen A. Rosenberg, Marsha Gordon, Ana Natale-Pereira, James S. Goydos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Little skin cancer prevention research has focused on the US Hispanic population. Objective: This study examined the prevalence and correlates of skin cancer surveillance behaviors among Hispanic adults. Methods: A population-based sample of 788 Hispanic adults residing in 5 southern and western states completed an online survey in English or Spanish in September 2011. The outcomes were ever having conducted a skin self-examination (SSE) and having received a total cutaneous examination (TCE) from a health professional. The correlates included sociodemographic, skin cancer-related, and psychosocial factors. Results: The rates of ever conducting a SSE or having a TCE were 17.6% and 9.2%, respectively. Based on the results of multivariable logistic regressions, factors associated with ever conducting a SSE included older age, English linguistic acculturation, a greater number of melanoma risk factors, more frequent sunscreen use, sunbathing, job-related sun exposure, higher perceived skin cancer risk, physician recommendation, more SSE benefits, and fewer SSE barriers. Factors associated with ever having a TCE were older age, English linguistic acculturation, a greater number of melanoma risk factors, ever having tanned indoors, greater skin cancer knowledge, higher perceived skin cancer severity, lower skin cancer worry, physician recommendation, more TCE benefits, and fewer SSE barriers. Limitations: The cross-sectional design limits conclusions regarding the causal nature of observed associations. Conclusions: Few Hispanic adults engage in skin cancer surveillance behaviors. The study highlights Hispanic subpopulations that are least likely to engage in skin cancer surveillance behaviors and informs the development of culturally appropriate interventions to promote these behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)576-584
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Hispanic
  • Latino
  • acculturation
  • physician skin examination
  • prevention
  • skin cancer
  • skin self-examination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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