Sleep Deprivation and Injuries in Part-Time Kentucky Farmers: Impact of Self Reported Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems on Injury Risk

Susan E. Spengler, Steven R. Browning, Deborah B. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

Part-time farmers who hold off-farm jobs may be at risk for injuries because of impaired performance resulting from inadequate sleep. For this study, 1,004 part-time male Kentucky farmers completed a telephone interview for the 1994 to 1995 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-funded Farm Family Health and Hazard Surveillance Project. Questions were included about demographics, sleep habits, and injury occurrence. Twelve percent of the farmers reported an injury requiring medical intervention in the previous year. Farmers reported sleeping an average of 7.6 hours daily. Approximately 6.7% of the sample had three symptoms of sleep apnea. Although hours of sleep were not related to injury incidence, sleep medication use (odds ratio [OR] = 2.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01 to 4.40) and presence of three sleep apnea symptoms (OR = 2.48, 95% CI = 1.13 to 5.41) were related to injury incidence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-382
Number of pages10
JournalWorkplace Health and Safety
Volume52
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2004 American Association of Occupational Health Nurses.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sleep Deprivation and Injuries in Part-Time Kentucky Farmers: Impact of Self Reported Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems on Injury Risk'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this