Smoke-Free Policy and Alcohol Use Among Undergraduate College Students

Karen M. Butler, Mary Kay Rayens, Ellen J. Hahn, Sarah M. Adkins, Ruth R. Staten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess attitudes and behaviors related to smoke-free policy among undergraduate student alcohol drinkers on a campus in a community with smoke-free bars. Design and Sample: This was a secondary data analysis of a study in which participants completed mailed surveys assessing demographic characteristics, attitudes and behaviors related to alcohol and tobacco use and smoke-free policy (n = 337). Opinion and behavior items were summarized descriptively; associations were examined using Kruskal Wallis tests and chi-square tests of association. Logistic regression tested for predictors of importance of smoke-free policy. Results: Respondents were predominantly female and Caucasian; mean age 20.3 years. One fourth were current smokers. Seventy-nine percent said the community smoke-free law had no effect on frequency of visiting bars. Eighty-seven percent said smoke-free policy in campus buildings was "somewhat" or "very important." Predictors of perceived importance of smoke-free policy included gender and smoking status. Conclusions: Most smokers in this sample did not experience a change in their motivation to quit smoking or in number of cigarettes smoked daily. Implementation of a community smoke-free law did not reduce the likelihood of visiting bars. Women and nonsmokers were more likely to rate smoke-free campus policy as very important.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-265
Number of pages10
JournalPublic Health Nursing
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • College students
  • Smoke-free policy
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing (all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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