Social communication following adult traumatic brain injury: A scoping review of theoretical models

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3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Social communication is the set of abilities that allows individuals to achieve relevant social goals across contexts. Speech-language pathology evaluation and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related social communication problems should be informed by evidence-supported theories of social communication. The primary purpose of this article is to summarize the results of a scoping review of theoretical models that speech-language pathologists may apply to the evaluation and treatment of social communication problems of adults with TBI. Method: A scoping review was conducted of PubMed, PsycINFO, and Embase for sources published in English between 1989 and 2020 that described human social communication and participation. Resulting sources were systematically examined for social communication models. Results: Nine theoretical models were identified that speech-language pathologists may apply to their assessment and treatment of social communication abilities of adults with TBI. Identified models were categorized thematically into one of three classes: cognitive models, social competence models, and pragmatic models. Using a framework developed for the purposes of this article, each identified model was evaluated, and one exemplar model in each class is described in depth. Conclusions: Social communication problems in adults post-TBI are common. The existence of multiple models empowers speech-language pathologists to select individual-focused assessment and treatment approaches to maximize intervention outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1735-1748
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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