Sociodemographic differences in patterns of nicotine and cannabis vaping among US adults

Delvon T. Mattingly, Akash Patel, Jana L. Hirschtick, Nancy L. Fleischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nicotine and cannabis vaping has increased over the past several years. While patterns of cigarette and cannabis co-use are well-documented, less is known about the intersection between nicotine and cannabis vaping, especially among adults. Thus, we categorized nicotine and cannabis vaping among adults (18+) who currently (past 30-day) used electronic vapor products (EVPs) from Wave 4 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study (n = 3795) as: 1) nicotine only, 2) cannabis only, 3) nicotine and cannabis, and 4) non-nicotine/non-cannabis e-liquid. We calculated vaping pattern proportions overall and by sociodemographic characteristics. Adjusted multinomial logistic regression models assessed associations between sociodemographic characteristics and vaping categories relative to nicotine-only vaping. Approximately half (54.2%) of adults who currently used EVPs vaped nicotine only, 7.4% vaped cannabis only, 23.8% vaped nicotine and cannabis, and 14.6% vaped non-nicotine/non-cannabis e-liquid. Young adults (aged 18–24) (vs. adults aged 35+) had at least three-fold greater odds of vaping cannabis only, nicotine and cannabis, and non-nicotine/non-cannabis e-liquid, compared to nicotine only. Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black (vs. non-Hispanic White) adults had 2.5–3 times greater odds of vaping cannabis only and non-nicotine/non-cannabis e-liquid, compared to nicotine only. Sexual minority adults (vs. heterosexual adults) had 1.5 times greater odds of vaping nicotine and cannabis, compared to nicotine only. Nearly half of adults who vaped EVPs consumed something other than nicotine only, and nicotine/cannabis vaping patterns differed by sociodemographic groups. Vaping and nicotine reduction efforts must recognize that adults who currently vape may be vaping cannabis, or neither nicotine nor cannabis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101715
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume26
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s)

Keywords

  • Cannabis
  • Co-use
  • Disparities
  • E-cigarette
  • Marijuana
  • Nicotine
  • Tobacco
  • Vaping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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