Sources of academic and self-regulatory efficacy beliefs of entering middle school students

Ellen L. Usher, Frank Pajares

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

228 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of Bandura's (1997) hypothesized sources of self-efficacy on the academic and self-regulatory efficacy beliefs of entering middle school students (N = 263) and to explore whether these sources differ as a function of gender, reading ability, and race/ethnicity. For the full sample, mastery experience, vicarious experience, social persuasions, and physiological state independently predicted academic and self-regulatory self-efficacy, with mastery experience proving the strongest predictor. Mastery experience and social persuasions predicted girls' academic and self-regulatory self-efficacy, whereas mastery and vicarious experiences predicted these self-beliefs for boys. African American students' mastery experiences and social persuasions predicted their academic self-efficacy. Mastery experience did not predict the self-efficacy beliefs of low-achieving students. Findings support and refine the theoretical tenets of Bandura's social cognitive theory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-141
Number of pages17
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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