Specifying the mechanisms and targets of emotion regulation: A translational framework from affective science to psychological treatment.

Matthew W. Southward, Shannon Sauer-Zavala, Jennifer S. Cheavens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emotion dysregulation is fundamental to a range of psychiatric disorders. Leading psychological treatments are often designed to teach several emotion regulation strategies. However, teaching a wide range of strategies may be an inefficient way to enhance emotional functioning. We propose a framework of emotion dysregulation to guide the development of more efficient and flexible interventions. We review motivational (i.e., self-efficacy), between-situation (i.e., increasing frequency, quantity, or quality of adaptive strategy use; decreasing frequency of maladaptive strategy use), and within-situation mechanisms (i.e., using more or fewer strategies in a given situation; optimally ordering strategies) as well as temporal targets of emotion regulation interventions (i.e., short-term effectiveness vs. long-term adaptiveness). Throughout, we detail recommendations for researchers to test these mechanisms and targets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-182
Number of pages15
JournalClinical Psychology: Science and Practice
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 19 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 American Psychological Association

Keywords

  • adaptiveness
  • emotion regulation
  • quality
  • self-efficacy
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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