Spinal Cord Tissue Bridges Validation Study: Predictive Relationships With Sensory Scores Following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

Andrew C. Smith, Denise R. O'Dell, Wesley A. Thornton, David Dungan, Eli Robinson, Ashesh Thaker, Robyn Gisbert, Kenneth A. Weber, Jeffrey C. Berliner, Stephanie R. Albin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), widths of ventral tissue bridges demonstrated significant predictive relationships with future pinprick sensory scores, and widths of dorsal tissue bridges demonstrated significant predictive relationships with future light touch sensory scores, following spinal cord injury (SCI). These studies involved smaller participant numbers, and external validation of their findings is warranted. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to validate these previous findings using a larger independent data set. Methods: Widths of ventral and dorsal tissue bridges were quantified using MRI in persons post cervical level SCI (average 3.7 weeks post injury), and pinprick and light touch sensory scores were acquired at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation (average 14.3 weeks post injury). Pearson product-moments were calculated and linear regression models were created from these data. Results: Wider ventral tissue bridges were significantly correlated with pinprick scores (r = 0.31, p < 0.001, N = 136) and wider dorsal tissue bridges were significantly correlated with light touch scores (r = 0.31, p < 0.001, N = 136) at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Conclusion: This retrospective study's results provide external validation of previous findings, using a larger sample size. Following SCI, ventral tissue bridges hold significant predictive relationships with future pinprick sensory scores and dorsal tissue bridges hold significant predictive relationships with future light touch sensory scores.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-115
Number of pages5
JournalTopics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 American Spinal Injury Association.

Keywords

  • light touch
  • MRI
  • pinprick
  • sensory testing
  • spinal cord injury
  • tissue bridge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology

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