Storytime programs as mirrors, windows, and sliding glass doors? Addressing children’s needs through diverse book selection

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Much research suggests that exposure to diverse books that feature the lived experiences of people with marginalized or underrepresented identities influences how children perceive their own value and the significance of others who do and do not look like them. Library associations have recently called for greater attention to issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion to be reflected across all aspects of library services and programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the print materials used in public library storytime programs to identify the extent to which storytime exposes children to diverse people. Results indicate that, across all categories examined, books shared in storytimes are lacking in terms of diversity. The authors conclude that librarians need to be much more intentional in their efforts to diversify services and programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-284
Number of pages16
JournalLibrary Quarterly
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (federal award identification number LG-96-17-0199-17). We express sincere gratitude to Janet Ingraham Dwyer, State Library of Ohio; Krista King-Oaks, Boone County (KY) Public Library; and Suzanne Walker and Beth Yates, Indiana State Library, for support of this project.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Library and Information Sciences

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