Strengths of children and adolescents in residential settings: Prevalence and associations with psychopathology and discharge placement

John S. Lyons, Nina D. Uziel-Miller, Frank Reyes, Patricia T. Sokol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: During the past few years there has been growing interest in developing strength-based approaches to services, particularly for children and adolescents. Method: This study assesses the prevalence of 30 strengths for a random sample of children and adolescents in residential placements in Florida. In addition, the relationship between strengths and clinical and functional characteristics is studied. Results: Results suggest that there is substantial variation across individuals on the presence of strengths and the potential for development. Strengths were associated with symptoms, risk behaviors, and functioning. Level of strengths predicted success in the reduction of risk behaviors during the child/adolescent's stay. In addition, the level of strengths was independently associated with good dispositional outcomes. Conclusions: The findings provide further empirical support for the importance of strengths and the utility of an integrated model that considers both psychopathology and strengths in planning for children's services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)176-181
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The research reported in this article was funded in part by the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Assessment
  • Children
  • Strengths

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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