Study Protocol: Type 1 Hybrid Effectiveness–Implementation Trial of a Behavioral Parent Training Intervention for Parents of Young Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Christina R. Studts, Julie A. Jacobs, Matthew L. Bush, Joneen Lowman, Liza M. Creel, Philip M. Westgate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and who use hearing aids or cochlear implants are more likely than their peers with typical hearing to exhibit behavior problems. Although multiple evidence-based interventions for child behavior problems exist, they are rarely delivered to children who are DHH, and no rigorous randomized controlled trials have been conducted to determine their effects with this population. This protocol describes a study aiming to test the effectiveness of an evidence-based behavioral parent training intervention adapted for parents of young children who are DHH and simultaneously to assess key implementation outcomes and multilevel contextual factors influencing implementation. Method: The protocol for a Type 1 hybrid effectiveness–implementation trial of a behavioral parent training intervention for parents of young children who are DHH is presented, including details of the study design, participants, assess-ments, and analyses. Using a stakeholder-engaged, mixed-methods approach, we will test the effects of the intervention versus treatment as usual on parenting behaviors, child behaviors, and a range of secondary effectiveness out-comes, including adherence to using hearing aids and cochlear implants as well as measures of child speech and language. We will assess the acceptability, feasibility, fidelity, and costs of the intervention from the perspectives of peer coaches who deliver the intervention, hearing health care clinicians (including audiologists and speech-language pathologists), and administrators of pro-grams serving young children who are DHH. Conclusions: Results of this trial will inform future efforts to close the gap between prevalence of behavioral problems in young children who are DHH and access to and use of evidence-based interventions to prevent and treat them. If effective, this intervention could be widely implemented using strategies informed by the findings of this study to benefit young children who are DHH and followed in hearing health care and their families.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1163-1178
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The protocol described was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Award R01DC016957 (Studts, PI). All project costs ($2,851,335) are financed with this Federal support. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors thank the parents and service providers who shared valuable information about their perspectives, experiences, and preferences in our for-mative work. Additionally, the authors would like to thank the research assistants and interventionists who con-tributed to preliminary studies for this trial, including Mea-gan Pilar, Allie Merritt, Cady Cornell, Mallory Antel, Vashisht Madabhushi, Meghan Phelan, Laura Bellnier, Emily Goble, Heather Davis, and Tess Smith. The authors also thank Cathy Lester, Sarah Roof, and Lori Travis for their ongoing work to connect us with state partnering agencies and Lisa Kovacs, Hands & Voices Director of Pro-grams, for contributions to training and adaptation resources. Special thanks to Yasaman Parsi, the REACH Institute, and Jessica Jaramillo for exceptional training and support in the FCU. We acknowledge the University of Kentucky Center for Clinical and Translational Science (UL1TR001998) and the University of Kentucky College of Medicine for supporting our preliminary studies. Finally, we are grateful to the members of our Hearing and Behavior Community Advisory Board, who informed this work each step of the way.

Funding Information:
The protocol described was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Award R01DC016957 (Studts, PI). All project costs ($2,851,335) are financed with this Federal support. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors thank the parents and service providers who shared valuable information about their perspectives, experiences, and preferences in our formative work. Additionally, the authors would like to thank the research assistants and interventionists who contributed to preliminary studies for this trial, including Mea-gan Pilar, Allie Merritt, Cady Cornell, Mallory Antel, Vashisht Madabhushi, Meghan Phelan, Laura Bellnier, Emily Goble, Heather Davis, and Tess Smith. The authors also thank Cathy Lester, Sarah Roof, and Lori Travis for their ongoing work to connect us with state partnering

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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