Supplier search in industrial clusters: Sheffield metal working in the 1990s

H. Doug Watts, Andrew M. Wood, Perry Wardle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Citation (SciVal)

Abstract

The typical industrial cluster tends to be seen as a cohesive and harmonious community of firms working together, albeit within a wider competitive context. Within such spatial clusters we might anticipate high levels of personal interaction between the owners/managers of firms, which might, in turn, have a bearing on intra-cluster trading patterns. As Grabher (1993, p. 4) observes, ‘social influences [can act] as contextual factors that support economic behaviour’. In addition to support from local organizations and institutions, a firm embedded in the socioeconomic milieu of a particular cluster might well gain from ‘the presence of an intricate [personal] network of mainly informal contacts of local actors (…) made up of personal face-to-face encounters, casual information flows, customer-supplier co-operation and the like’ (Camagni 1991, p. 133).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProximity, Distance and Diversity
Subtitle of host publicationIssues on Economic Interaction and Local Development
Pages111-128
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781351908030
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Arnoud Lagendijk and Päivi Oinas 2005.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting (all)

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