Sustained improvements in dynamic balance and landing mechanics after a 6-week neuromuscular training program in college women's basketball players

Kate R. Pfile, Phillip A. Gribble, Gretchen E. Buskirk, Sara M. Meserth, Brian G. Pietrosimone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Epidemiological data demonstrate the need for lower-extremity injury-prevention training. Neuromuscularcontrol (NMC) programs are immediately effective at minimizing lower-extremity injury risk and improving sport-related performance measures. Research investigating lasting effects after an injury-prevention program is limited. Objective: To determine whether dynamic balance, landing mechanics, and hamstring and quadriceps strength could be improved after a 6-wk NMC intervention and maintained for a season. Design: Prospective case series. Setting: Controlled laboratory. Participants: 11 Division I women's basketball players (age 19.40 ± 1.35 y, height 178.05 ± 7.52 cm, mass 72.86 ± 10.70 kg). Interventions: Subjects underwent testing 3 times, completing the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Landing Error Scoring System (LESS), and isometric strength testing for the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles. Pretest and posttest 1 occurred immediately before and after the intervention, respectively, and posttest 2 at the end of the competitive season, 9 mo after posttest 1. Subjects participated in eighteen 30-min plyometric and NMC-training sessions over a 6-wk period. Main Outcome Measures: The normalized SEBT composite score, normalized peak isometric hamstrings:quadriceps (H:Q) ratio, and the LESS total score. Results: The mean composite reach significantly improved over time (F2,10 = 6.96, P = .005) where both posttest scores were significantly higher than pretest (70.41% ± 4.08%) (posttest 1 73.48% ± 4.19%, t10 = -3.11, P = .011) and posttest 2 (74.2% ± 4.77%, t10 = -3.78, P = .004). LESS scores significantly improved over time (F2,10 = 6.29, P = .009). The pretest LESS score (7.30 ± 3.40) was higher than posttest 1 (4.9 ± 1.20, t10 = 2.71, P = .024) and posttest 2 (5.44 ± 1.83, t10 = 2.58, P = .030). There were no statistically significant differences (P > .05) over time for the H:Q ratio when averaging both legs (F2,10 = 0.83, P = .45). Conclusions: A 6-wk NMC program improved landing mechanics and dynamic balance over a 9-mo period in women's basketball players. NMC adaptations can be retained without an in-season maintenance program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-240
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Keywords

  • Injury prevention
  • Knee
  • Lower extremity
  • Plyometrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sustained improvements in dynamic balance and landing mechanics after a 6-week neuromuscular training program in college women's basketball players'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this