Systemic success in physical education: The east valley phenomenon

Keven A. Prusak, Todd Pennington, Susan Vincent Graser, Aaron Beighle, Charles F. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Siedentop and Locke (1997) proposed three critical elements that must exist in our profession to make a difference and achieve systemic success in physical education (SSPE): (a) quality PE in the schools, (b) effective physical education teacher education (PETE) programs, and (c) a working relationship between the two. Using Cuban's (1992) curriculum change and stability framework, this qualitative study examines the existence of a program that has achieved all three elements in the southwestern US. For over three decades some seventy-two teachers in dozens of schools have yearly served over 40,000 children. This study revealed a fully functioning model consisting of four key, interdependent components driven by a system of accountability measures. The results of the SSPE model-quality PE for children-is achieved by (a) district-wide mandated curriculum, methodologies and language, (b) well-defined district PE coordinator roles, (c) a partnership university, and (d) frequent, ongoing professional development. Results of this study strengthen Siedentop and Locke's (1997) recommendation for collaborative efforts between universities and partner school districts and provide a model to guide and manage the curriculum change process in K-6 PE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-106
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Teaching in Physical Education
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

Keywords

  • Accountability
  • Curriculum change
  • Physical education
  • Quality physical education
  • Systemic success

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Education

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