Talk of “broken borders” and stone walls: Anti-immigrant discourse and legislation from California to South Carolina

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Anti-immigration or anti-immigrant legislation has been making its way through statehouses across the United States over the past two decades. This chapter demonstrates some ways to situate local anti-immigration legislation within that larger national context using the concepts and methods of anthropology. It then argues that anthropological perspectives can contribute to both academic and activist analyses of the most recent anti-immigrant legislation and that such analyses are particularly needed in southeastern US states like South Carolina, which has a rapidly growing new immigrant population from Latin America and other regions of the world. The chapter emerges from a long-term ethnographic research project on how individuals make sense of policies related to globalization, like the North American Free Trade Agreement, and anticipate the effects of those policies on their everyday lives. Lindsey Graham’s legislative efforts on immigration succeeded only after the senator was told by his colleagues to focus on the need to secure the southern border.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationReflecting on America
Subtitle of host publicationAnthropological Views of U.S. Culture
Pages121-134
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781351551922
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Taylor & Francis.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (all)

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