The Association of Persistent Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety with Recurrent Acute Coronary Syndrome Events: A Prospective Observational Study

Abdullah S. Alhurani, Ayman M. Hamdan-Mansour, Muayyad M. Ahmad, Gabrielle McKee, Sharon O’donnell, Frances O’brien, Mary Mooney, Zyad T. Saleh, Debra K. Moser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the role of persistent symptoms of depression and anxiety in a second acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event. Data presented in this study were from an RCT study. A follow-up for 24 months after baseline to detect a second ACS event among 1162 patients from five hospitals. Hierarchal Cox regression analyses were used. The results showed that persistent depression only (HR 2.27; 95% CI: 1.35–3.81; p = 0.002), and comorbid persistent depression and anxiety (HR 2.03; 95% CI: 1.03–3.98; p = 0.040) were the significant predictors of a second ACS event. Secondary education level compared to primary educational level (HR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43–0.93; p = 0.020) and college or more education level compared to primary educational level (HR 0.47; 95% CI: 0.27–0.84; p = 0.011) were the only demographic variables that were significant predictors of a second event. The study reveals that attention must be paid by healthcare providers to assess and manage persistent depression; particularly when it is co-morbid with anxiety.

Original languageEnglish
Article number383
JournalHealthcare (Switzerland)
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Health Policy
  • Health Information Management
  • Leadership and Management

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