The Cedar Project*: Historical Trauma and Vulnerability to Sexual Assault Among Young Aboriginal Women Who Use Illicit Drugs in Two Canadian Cities

Margo E. Pearce, Alden H. Blair, Mary Teegee, Stephen W. Pan, Vicky Thomas, Hongbin Zhang, Martin T. Schechter, Patricia M. Spittal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explored trends of sexual assault and associated risk factors within a cohort of young Aboriginal women who used drugs in Vancouver and Prince George, Canada, between 2003 and 2010. Results demonstrated no change in the trend of sexual assault over time; however, odds of sexual assault were significantly higher for women who had at least one parent who attended residential school, had experienced childhood sexual abuse, were involved in sex work, had been offered money to not use condoms, had used injection drugs, had injected cocaine and opiates daily, had binged with injection drugs, and had difficulty accessing clean syringes. Findings highlight the urgency of interventions addressing the complexity of risk and opportunities for healing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-329
Number of pages17
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 17 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2015.

Keywords

  • drug use
  • sexual assault
  • young Aboriginal women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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