The Duality of Human Experience: Perspectives From Psychosocial Adaptation to Chronic Illness and Disability—Historical Views and Theoretical Models

Hanoch Livneh, Brian T. McMahon, Phillip D. Rumrill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines the current views on the duality of the human experience as portrayed within the process of coping with and managing traumatic life events, with a special emphasis on those views associated with the onset, or diagnosis, of chronic illnesses and disabilities (CID). In this article, experiential dualities are reviewed with a focus on (a) broadly defined modes of psychosocial adaptation to CID, such as coping versus succumbing, and disabled versus nondisabled selves; (b) models of denial, which often dichotomize its structure as reflecting complete or major versus partial or minor denial; and (c) models of personal growth following adversity and traumatic events, such as the onset or diagnosis of severe and life-threatening CID. Focus is placed on the dualities that dichotomize human functioning following traumatic experiences, along such categories as genuine or transcendent growth versus self-deception or illusory growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-77
Number of pages11
JournalRehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2018.

Keywords

  • chronic illness and disability
  • denial
  • experiential duality
  • personal/psychological growth
  • psychosocial adaptation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Duality of Human Experience: Perspectives From Psychosocial Adaptation to Chronic Illness and Disability—Historical Views and Theoretical Models'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this