The effect of dietary selenium source and level on the uptake of selenium by developing chick embryos

N. D. Paton, A. H. Cantor, A. J. Pescatore, M. J. Ford, C. A. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

80 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied the effect of dietary source (organic or inorganic) and level of Se on the Se uptake of chick embryos. After receiving a low-Se diet for 16 wk, 126 Leghorn laying hens were randomly assigned to one of seven dietary treatments. Treatments consisted of feeding a low-Se basal diet alone or with one of three levels of added Se (0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 mg/kg Se) supplied by sodium selenite or Se-enriched yeast. Fertile eggs were collected after 33 d of feeding the experimental diets. Eggs were subjected to no incubation or incubation for 5, 10, 15, or 20 d. Non-incubated eggs were separated, and the yolk and albumen were assayed separately for Se. Incubated eggs were separated into the embryo and extra-embryonic portions, which were assayed separately for Se. Se concentrations of the yolk and albumen were significantly different among dietary treatments. Compared with eggs from hens fed sodium selenite, yolk and albumen Se concentrations were higher in eggs from hens fed Se yeast. Embryonic and extra-embryonic Se concentrations were higher in eggs from hens fed Se yeast than eggs from hens fed sodium selenite. The largest increase in embryonic Se concentration was observed during Days 10 to 15 of incubation. It was concluded that Se source and dietary inclusion level influenced the Se concentration of portions of developing embryonated eggs and that embryonic Se concentration changed during incubation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1548-1554
Number of pages7
JournalPoultry Science
Volume81
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2002

Keywords

  • Chick embryo
  • Laying hen
  • Selenite
  • Selenium yeast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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