The effect of education and counselling on knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about responses to acute myocardial infarction symptoms

T. Buckley, S. McKinley, R. Gallagher, K. Dracup, D. K. Moser, L. M. Aitken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

The time that elapses from the onset of symptoms of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to treatment has a significant effect on mortality and morbidity. This study reports the effectiveness of an education and counselling intervention on knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about AMI symptoms and the appropriate response to symptoms. The intervention was tested in a randomised controlled trial of 200 people with a history of coronary heart disease (CHD). The groups were equivalent at baseline on study outcomes, clinical history and sociodemographic characteristics with the exception of more women in the intervention group (38% vs. 24%). The results of repeated measures ANOVA showed that the intervention resulted in improved knowledge of CHD, AMI symptoms and the appropriate response to symptoms that was sustained to 12 months (p = 0.02). There were no differences between groups' attitudes and beliefs over time. It is concluded that a short individual teaching and counselling intervention resulted in improved knowledge of CHD, AMI symptoms and the appropriate response to symptoms in people at risk of AMI sustained to 12 months.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-111
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (R01 NR05323).

Keywords

  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • Counselling
  • Education
  • Prehospital delay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medical–Surgical
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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