The effects of joint position and direction of joint motion on proprioceptive sensibility in anterior cruciate ligament-deficient athletes

Paul A. Borsa, Scott M. Lephart, James J. Irrgang, Marc R. Safran, Freddie H. Fu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

155 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied a group of anterior cruciate ligament-deficient athletes to identify whether joint position and direction of joint motion have a significant effect on proprioception. Twenty-nine anterior cruciate ligament deficient athletes were tested for their threshold to detect passive motion at both 15°and 45°moving into the directions of both flexion and extension. The single-legged hop test was used to identify function in the deficient limb. Results demonstrated statistically significant deficits in threshold to detect passive motion for the deficient limb at 15°moving into extension. For the deficient limb, threshold to detect passive motion was significantly more sensitive moving into extension than flexion at a starting angle of 15°; at a starting angle of 15°moving into extension threshold was significantly more sensitive than at a starting angle of 45°moving into extension. We conclude that in deficient limbs proprioception is significantly more sensitive in the end ranges of knee extension (15°) and is significantly more sensitive moving into the direction of extension. To effectively restore reflex stabilization of the lower limb we recommend a rehabilitation program emphasizing performance-based, weightbearing, closed kinetic chain exercise for the muscle groups that act on the knee joint.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)336-340
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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