The effects of pain severity, pain catastrophizing, depression, and exercise on perceived disability in acute low back pain patients

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4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Purpose: The effectiveness of cognitive treatments for low back pain, a prevalent and costly condition, are commonly based on the principles of the Cognitive Behavioral Model of Fear of Movement/(Re)injury. In this model, persons with a painful injury/experience who also engage in pain catastrophizing are most likely to avoid activity leading to disability. The validation of this model in patients with acute low back is limited. The purpose of this project was to examine the relationship of perceived disability with variables identified in the Cognitive Behavioral Model of Fear of Movement/(Re)injury such as, pain severity, pain catastrophizing, depression, and exercise in persons with acute low back pain. Methods: A multiple linear regression model was used to assess the association of perceived disability with pain severity, pain catastrophizing, depression, and exercise at baseline among subjects with acute low back pain (N = 44) participating in a randomized clinical trial to prevent transition to chronic low back pain. Results: Controlling for age, the overall model was significant for perceived disability (F[5, 35] = 14.2; p < .001). Higher scores of pain catastrophizing (p = .003) and pain severity (p < .001) were associated with higher perceived disability levels. Exercise and depression were not significantly associated with perceived disability. Implications: The use of the Cognitive Behavioral Model of Fear of Movement/(Re)injury in acute LBP patients is appropriate; because this model is commonly used as rationale for the effectiveness of cognitive treatments, these findings have clinical relevance in the treatment of this condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)436-448
Number of pages13
JournalResearch and theory for nursing practice
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported in part by grants by the National Center for Research Resources and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health [UL1TR001998]. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. This research was originally presented at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting. ES contributed to conception and design, data acquisition, analysis, drafting and revising of manuscript, revisions, and final approval; ATW contributed to conception and design, analysis, drafting of manuscript, and final approval; QH conntributed to data acquisition, drafting manuscript, revisions, and final approval; LC contributed to conception and design, revising of manuscript, and final approval; MKR contributed to analysis, revising of manuscript, and final approval; SS contributed to conception and design, analysis, revisions, and final approval.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Springer Publishing Company.

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Disability
  • Low back pain
  • Pain catastrophizing
  • Pain severity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Research and Theory

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