The Effects of Workplace Support on Workplace Disruptions: Differences Between White and Black Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

Theresia M. Pachner, Kathryn Showalter, Paige Maffett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Abuser-initiated workplace disruptions are experienced by women who are in abusive intimate relationships. However, workplace disruptions may be prevented with targeted workplace supports. Using pilot data, this study examined relationships between workplace disruptions and workplace supports. Crosstabulation and Fisher’s exact test results were stratified by race to understand potential racial discrimination of survivors. Findings revealed supports are associated with infrequent workplace disruptions for Black women, but White women were extended a wider variety of supports, even with frequent disruptions. Discussion of results is applied to workplaces and policy makers seeking to better support employees experiencing partner violence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3400-3414
Number of pages15
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume28
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This study was supported by funds from the University of Michigan School of Social Work during a Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2021.

Keywords

  • race
  • workplace discrimination
  • workplace disruptions
  • workplace supports

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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