The General Content of Postinoculation Talk: Recalled Issue-Specific Conversations Following Inoculation Treatments

Bobi Ivanov, Jeanetta D. Sims, Josh Compton, Claude H. Miller, Kimberly A. Parker, James L. Parker, Kylie J. Harrison, Joshua M. Averbeck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

For much of inoculation theory's 50-year history, research has focused on intrapersonal processes of resistance such as threat and subvocal counterarguing. More recently, attention has shifted to interpersonal processes of inoculation-conferred resistance, specifically, postinoculation talk (PIT). This study examined the substance of PIT, and how people may talk to one another for reassurance and advocacy following an inoculation. Findings indicate advocacy attempts were significantly greater within the inoculation condition. Those inoculated were more likely to a) pass along material included in the inoculation treatment, b) share issue-relevant novel material, c) talk about topics related to the target issue, and d) be challenged by conversational partners when attempting advocacy. Results help explain what inoculated individuals talk about following an inoculation treatment, and how PIT may spread the process of resistance along social networks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)218-238
Number of pages21
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Western States Communication Association.

Keywords

  • Counterarguing
  • Inoculation
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • Postinoculation Talk
  • Resistance
  • Word of Mouth Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

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