The Good, the Bad, and the Risky: Can Birds Be Incorporated as Biological Control Agents into Integrated Pest Management Programs?

Karina Garcia, Elissa M. Olimpi, Daniel S. Karp, David J. Gonthier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Some bird species often benefit farmers by suppressing invertebrate crop pests, yet birds are rarely considered in integrated pest management (IPM) strategies. This is likely because some bird species pose risks to farmers through crop damage, intraguild predation, and food safety concerns. Nonetheless, the benefits of some bird species on crop production are often substantial. Therefore, understanding when birds are most likely to enhance crop production (and when they are most likely to depress it) is crucial for designing effective IPM strategies. Here, we briefly review the literature on birds in agricultural systems, discuss examples of how birds can provide services and disservices to crops, examine factors that influence the net effects of birds, and discuss emerging tools that will help fill key knowledge gaps surrounding the complex roles of birds in agricultural systems.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11
JournalJournal of Integrated Pest Management
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

Keywords

  • biocontrol
  • birds
  • ecosystem services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science
  • Insect Science
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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