The impact of HACCP on U.S. seafood exports: The case of fish, mollusks, and shellfish other than mollusks

Xiaoqian Li, Sayed Saghaian, Michael Reed

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article investigates the effects of HACCP implementation on U.S. exports of three seafood categories: fish, mollusks, and shellfish other than mollusks. The Poisson Pseudo-Maximum-Likelihood method with fixed effects is used to control for unobserved country characteristics and zero trade observations. The results indicate that food safety regulations have differential effects across seafood products. The HACCP effect on seafood exports of mollusks, which have higher inherent hazards, is positive and statistically significant. This coefficient infers that mandatory HACCP implementation has improved the exports of mollusk products. The effects on the other two categories are positive, but not statistically significant.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAgriculture and Trade
Subtitle of host publicationInternational Perspectives
Pages111-123
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781629489858
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Fish
  • Food policy
  • HACCP
  • Mollusks
  • Shellfish

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (all)

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