The independent use of self-instructions for the acquisition of untrained multi-step tasks for individuals with an intellectual disability: A review of the literature

Katie A. Smith, Sally B. Shepley, Jennifer L. Alexander, Kevin M. Ayres

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Systematic instruction on multi-step tasks (e.g., cooking, vocational skills, personal hygiene) is common for individuals with an intellectual disability. Unfortunately, when individuals with disabilities turn 22-years-old, they no longer receive services in the public school system in most states and systematic instruction often ends (. Bouck, 2012). Rather than focusing instructional time on teacher-delivered training on the acquisition of specific multi-step tasks, teaching individuals with disabilities a pivotal skill, such as using self-instructional strategies, may be a more meaningful use of time. By learning self-instruction strategies that focus on generalization, individuals with disabilities can continue acquiring novel multi-step tasks in post-secondary settings and remediate skills that are lost over time. This review synthesizes the past 30 years of research related to generalized self-instruction to learn multi-step tasks, provides information about the types of self-instructional materials used, the ways in which participants received training to use them, and concludes with implications for practitioners and recommendations for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-30
Number of pages12
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume40
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015.

Keywords

  • Intellectual disability
  • Self-directed
  • Self-instruction
  • Self-prompting
  • Student-directed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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