The influence of communal vs. individual learning context on the academic performance in social studies of grade 4-5 African-Americans

A. Wade Boykin, Amy J. Lilja, Kenneth M. Tyler

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Empirical research utilizing the communal learning construct suggests that culturally-informed pedagogy enhances academic performance for African-American children. The present investigation examined the effect of culturally-informed learning contexts on recall performance in geography lessons. The sample consisted of 69 African-American Grade 4-5 public school students. Weeks 1 and 2 consisted of both learning and testing phases. Week 3 consisted only of a testing phase. Analyses of variance techniques revealed that overall subjects in the communal learning context performed significantly better on each of the two weekly quizzes and on the comprehensive examination than those in the individual learning context. Limitations of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-244
Number of pages18
JournalLearning Environments Research
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), U.S. Department of Education (R-117-D40005). The opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of OERI, and no official endorsement should be inferred. This study was part of the second author’s Master’s thesis while a graduate student in the Department of Psychology, Howard University.

Keywords

  • Academic Performance
  • African-American students
  • Communal learning
  • Learning context

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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