The natural history of oral human papillomavirus in young costa rican women

Daniel C. Beachler, Krystle A. Lang Kuhs, Linda Struijk, John Schussler, Rolando Herrero, Carolina Porras, Allan Hildesheim, Bernal Cortes, Joshua Sampson, Wim Quint, Paula Gonzalez, Aimée R. Kreimer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and related oropharyngeal cancer are uncommon in lower-income countries, particularly compared to HPV-associated cervical cancer. However, little is known about the natural history of oral HPV in less-developed settings and how it compares to the natural history of cervical HPV. Methods: Three hundred fifty women aged 22 to 33 years from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial provided exfoliated cells from the cervical and oral regions at 2 visits 2 years apart. Samples from both visits were tested for 25 characterized a HPV types by the SPF10 PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay-LiPA25 version 1 system. Risk factors for oral HPV persistence were calculated utilizing generalized estimating equations with a logistic link. Results: Among the 82 women with characterized a oral HPV DNA detected at baseline, 14 persisted and were detected 2 years later (17.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 10.9-28.5%) and was similar to the persistence of a cervical HPV (40/223; 17.7%; 95% CI, 13.1-23.9%; P = 0.86). Acquisition of new a oral HPV typewas low; incident infection (1.7%; 95% CI, 0.6-3.7%). Conclusions: Oral HPV DNA is uncommon in young women in Latin America, and often appears to clear within a few years at similar rates to cervical HPV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-449
Number of pages8
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume44
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2017 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association. All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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