The "open-book" variation of component separation for repair of massive midline abdominal wall hernia

L. Scott Ennis, Jeffrey S. Young, Thomas J. Gampper, David B. Drake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

The reconstruction of massive midline abdominal wall defects as a result of intra-abdominal catastrophes has long challenged the reconstructive surgeon. Previously, the lack of autogenous tissue often forced the surgeon to resort to synthetic materials, which may be complicated by adhesions, enterocutaneous fistulas, and infection. The introduction of the "components of anatomic separation" technique by Ramirez et al. in 1990 allowed for autogenous reconstruction using bipedicle rectus flaps. This technique was far superior to any previous option, but it had its limitations. The authors report a modification to the component separation technique which may allow larger defects to be closed as well as diminish the weakness left below the arcuate line found in some of the previously reported techniques. Ten patients are discussed for which this modified technique of component separation was employed. The follow-up ranges from 5 weeks to 53 months.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)733-742
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume69
Issue number9
StatePublished - 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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