The psychological consequences of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for family members of patients at risk for sudden death

Kathleen Dracup, Debra K. Moser, Shelley E. Taylor, Peter M. Guzy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine psychological consequences of teaching cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to family members of patients at risk for sudden death. Methods. Patient-family pairs (n = 337) were randomized into one of four groups: control, CPR only, CPR with cardiac risk factor education, and CPR with a social support intervention. Only family members received CPR training. Data on emotional state and psychosocial adjustment to illness were collected at baseline, 2 weeks, and 3 and 6 months following CPR training. Results. There were no significant differences in the emotional states of family members across the four groups. However, significant differences in psychosocial adjustment and emotional states occurred in patients across treatment groups following CPR training. Patients whose family members learned CPR with the social support intervention reported better psychosocial adjustment and less anxiety and hostility than patients in the other groups. Control patients reported better psychosocial adjustment and less emotional distress than patients in the CPR- only and CPR-education groups. Conclusions. These findings support tailoring family CPR training so that instruction does not result in negative psychological states in patients. The findings also illustrate the efficacy of a simple intervention that combines CPR training with social support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1434-1439
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume87
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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