The relationship between hip strength and the Y balance test

Benjamin R. Wilson, Kaley E. Robertson, Jeremy M. Burnham, Michael C. Yonz, Mary Lloyd Ireland, Brian Noehren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: The Y Balance Test was developed as a test of dynamic postural control and has been shown to be predictive of lowerextremity injury. However, the relationship between hip strength and performance on the Y Balance Test has not been fully elucidated. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify the relationship between components of isometric hip strength and the Y Balance Test, to provide clinicians better guidance as to specific areas of muscle performance to address in the event of poor performance on the Y Balance Test. Design: Laboratory study. Setting: Biomechanics laboratory. Participants: A total of 73 healthy participants (40 males and 33 females) volunteered for this study. Intervention: None. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed the Y Balance Test on the right leg. The authors then measured peak isometric torque in hip external rotation, abduction, and extension. Correlations were calculated between torque measurements, normalized for mass and Y Balance Test performance. Significant relationships were used in linear regression models to determine which variables were predictive of the Y Balance Test performance. Results: The authors found significant positive correlations between Y Balance Test performance and hip abduction strength. They also found correlations between the Y Balance Test and hip extension and external rotation strengths. Linear regression analysis showed hip abduction to be the only significant predictor of Y Balance performance. Conclusions: The authors found the strongest association between the Y Balance Test and hip abduction strength. They also showed smaller but significant associations with hip extension and external rotation strength. When entered into a linear regression analysis, hip abduction strength was the only significant predictor of Y Balance performance. Using this information, practitioners should look to hip abduction strength when patients exhibit deficits in the Y Balance Test.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)445-450
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Sport Rehabilitation
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Keywords

  • Injury prevention
  • Neuromuscular control
  • Postural stability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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